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Albert_PRayan

English Blues: Is it ‘was’ or ‘were’ after we use couple?

Albert P' Rayan tells us how to use the word 'couple' correctly in sentences, what to use before it and the meaning of other words related to the same. Read on to find out

Published on 13th March 2021
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New tools to make kids' ebooks easier to read on Google Play Books

With "Tap to Read", users can tap a word to hear it read out loud. The 'Kid-Friendly Dictionary' defines words for a young audience, often with illustrations on Google Play Books

Published on 7th March 2021
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#ThrowBackToday: Reminiscing the poetic side of Sarojini Naidu on her death anniversary today

In today's #TBT we talk about Sarojini Naidu, President of the Indian National Congress, India's first woman governor and much more, yes. But also the poet who, with her nimble words, swayed us all

Published on 2nd March 2021
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This Hyderabad-based self-publishing house helps known public figures tell their tale on their own terms

Which popular personality's words would you like to read? Look out for Kahaniya Quill because they might just publish their book. The consultation services they offer is what makes them different

Published on 23rd February 2021
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Dogs can learn new words after hearing them only four times, finds new study

A new study, just published in Scientific Reports, has provided surprising results about how quickly the gifted dogs can learn new words

Published on 26th January 2021
2020-12-21

Literature from the South is pan-Indian, even global: Kerala Governor delivers the opening keynote of TNIE's Dakshin Lit Fest

Governor of Kerala Arif Mohammad Khan inaugurated The New Indian Express' Dakshin Lit Fest 2020 virtually with his wise words and implored us all to make the most of COVID-induced loneliness 

Published on 21st December 2020
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Because truly, words are all we have, folks. So use them wisely!

Here's the columnist Pro Tip for you: When you use words impeccably, you create magic with them. Use words for your good, to create what you desire. Stop using them against yourself or others.

Published on 21st November 2020
Tamanna_Mishra-1

How this social media project aims to replace misogynistic and casteist slurs across Indian languages

Tamanna Mishra and Neha Thakur started The Gaali Project on Instagram and Twitter as a platform to promote alternative swear words which they have crowdsourced

Published on 5th November 2020
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How you can crack the best jokes and still be sensitive about it 

This week, The Coach continues to discuss the weight of our words and why we must be careful when making comments about others. He also breaks down sensitivity and offers us some noteworthy points 

Published on 9th October 2020
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Gurugram Class 8 student wins first Collins National Online Spelling Bee

The final went up to 12 rounds, where students were given words from the same band of difficulty level. 44 words were used in the final and Arjun's winning word was 'excusable'

Published on 6th October 2020
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Let's bid goodbye to old, overused terms: Common cliches you can avoid in the English language

Have the habit of using high-sounding phrases and old-fashioned words in formal letters and emails? Don't think that you can impress the reader by using them and overusing the word, 'please'

Published on 4th October 2020
online-content-istock

One in four Indians use weak passwords for online accounts: Report

On the other hand, 32 per cent of the people allow browsers on the devices to save their passwords and the exactly equal number of people never follow this practice

Published on 30th September 2020
basics22

English Blues: What do words like 'on cloud nine', 'music to my ears' mean?

When we say that something is music to our ears, we mean that it is pleasant to hear.  Everyone is happy to hear kind and encouraging words said by others

Published on 27th July 2020
English words

Learning English: What do words like 'fast-track', 'backtrack', 'back-pedal' mean?

To ‘fast-track’ means to accelerate or speed up the progress of something. The other words that can be used instead of ‘fast-track’ include hasten, quicken, rush and expedite

Published on 11th July 2020
English words

How words can help you move forward or even hold you back

Pro Tip: The words you habitually use affect your reality. Change words that hold you back, choose words that move you forward

Published on 27th June 2020

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