• Search results for English language
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language2

Are you a mumpsimus? What does it mean and how to use it in context

Any person who is persistent in repeating a mistake is called a mumpsimus. Albert P' Rayan speaks about its origin and more

Published on 31st October 2020
tag_reuters

Hong Kong postpones next year's university entrance exams due to COVID-19

The Chinese and English language speaking components will be cancelled again after the pandemic forced a similar arrangement this year

Published on 1st September 2020
English words

Learning new words and phrases: What do phrases and words like 'abetment to suicide', 'allege' mean? 

‘Abetment’ is a legal term.  The word ‘abet’ means to encourage someone to do something wrong or undesirable or to assist someone to commit a crime

Published on 15th August 2020
language

Greek to you, Sanskrit to me: What do phrases like 'hot potato', 'bone of contention' mean?

An issue over which there is continuing disagreement is called a bone of contention.   NEP draft was the bone of contention during the past year and it continues to be controversial

Published on 9th August 2020
vocabulary

A guide to building your word power: It is important to know both the grammar and the vocabulary of a language

To learn any foreign language effectively, it is important to know both the grammar and the vocabulary of the target language

Published on 1st August 2020
basics22

English Blues: What do words like 'on cloud nine', 'music to my ears' mean?

When we say that something is music to our ears, we mean that it is pleasant to hear.  Everyone is happy to hear kind and encouraging words said by others

Published on 27th July 2020
language2

Learning new words: What do the terms 'bubble boy', 'bubble girl' mean?

What does the term ‘bubble boy’ mean? It has two different meanings. The primary meaning of the word refers to the genetic disorder called SCID, also known as ‘bubble boy disease’

Published on 18th July 2020
English words

Learning English: What do words like 'fast-track', 'backtrack', 'back-pedal' mean?

To ‘fast-track’ means to accelerate or speed up the progress of something. The other words that can be used instead of ‘fast-track’ include hasten, quicken, rush and expedite

Published on 11th July 2020
English learning

Upgrade your English language skills: What is collocational competence?

Why is it important to develop collocational competence? It is not enough to teach grammar alone but it is also important to raise learners' awareness about collocations

Published on 27th June 2020
English words

How words can help you move forward or even hold you back

Pro Tip: The words you habitually use affect your reality. Change words that hold you back, choose words that move you forward

Published on 27th June 2020
language

Are you a 'snowflake'? What the words 'snowflake generation', 'male chauvinists' mean

Do we know the exact meaning of the words snowflakes, feminism, sexist, MCPs and the likes? Read on to find out what they mean and how to use them

Published on 20th June 2020
basics22

Here's when to use direct or indirect speech while conversing

Great storytellers and conversationalists use direct speech when they narrate stories or experiences and interact with others

Published on 6th June 2020
english

Importance of grammar: How written and spoken grammar are different when it comes to everyday interaction

Spoken grammar (SG) is the grammar of everyday interaction.  It is informal and natural. SG is flexible in its word order

Published on 25th May 2020
language2

Why punctuation marks play an important role in providing meaning to the English language

Some newspapers drop the Oxford comma as the editors think that it is unnecessary. Omitting the Oxford comma can confuse the reader and lead to a misunderstanding

Published on 9th May 2020
language

Understanding singular vs plural: How to use words and phrases 'group', 'number of' and more

Collective nouns such as audience, class, crowd, family, committee, team, panel, and staff can take either singular verbs or plural verbs depending on the context

Published on 15th February 2020

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