IIT Guwahati, Columbia University develop optical driving process to produce nanopatterns

Nanopatterning involves creating patterns on materials at the nanometer scale, which is a hundred thousand times smaller than the width of a single human hair
This resulted in the formation of atomically sharp lines across the sample
This resulted in the formation of atomically sharp lines across the sampleEdexLive Desk

The Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Guwahati and Columbia University, United States of America (USA), scientists have developed a method for nanopatterning using a simple tabletop IR (infrared) laser. This was stated in a press release received from the institute. 

Dr Rishi Maiti, Assistant Professor in the Department of Physics at IIT Guwahati, formerly a post-doctoral scientist from Alexander Gaeta’s quantum and non-linear photonics group, has published the findings of this research in the journal, Science Advances.

Nanopatterning involves creating patterns on materials at the nanometer scale, which is a hundred thousand times smaller than the width of a single human hair. 

By employing this technique, termed "unzipping", the researchers were able to cleave hexagonal boron nitride using an infrared laser. This resulted in the formation of atomically sharp lines across the sample, measuring just a few nanometers in width. Laser wavelengths at 7.3 micrometres facilitated clean lattice breaks, yielding controllable nanostructures.

Emphasising the significance of this breakthrough, Dr Maiti said, "This novel nano-patterning technique using optically induced strain opens doors to a myriad of possibilities in nanoscience and technology. Its simplicity and effectiveness mark a significant advancement in the field, with far-reaching implications across various industries.”

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